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Developing a successful co-parenting plan

On Behalf of | Apr 5, 2017 | Family Law |

As tough as divorce is on parents in Dunn, the children are often the ones who suffer the most. Many parents resort to focusing more on themselves so they can minimize the negative impact of their new relationship status on their lives. There is nothing wrong with parents doing this, but it can cause them to neglect their kids. Divorce is a time where the children should come first. Parents who want to make their divorces easier on their children and to minimize the effects of living in two different households should work on their co-parenting plans.

Remain polite and respectful

No matter how contentious their relationship is, parents should watch how they talk to and treat each other. It does not matter if the kids are around or not; they can feel when there is tension and conflict between their parents. Such negative feelings can influence kids’ behaviors and result in them despising one or both of their parents. Children who are unhappy with their parents because of their divorces tend to act out, which can make it difficult for their parents nurture them.

Stay on the same page and include the kids

Parents should discuss their plans together and should remain on the same page even though they are raising their children in separate households. They should establish similar rules in their homes for their kids to follow to provide consistency and stability. These rules can help show children that even though their parents have separate lives and are no longer with each other, they are still an important and present part of their lives.

Consider each other

Make the children top priority. Parents who manage to treat each other civilly and with respect can better manage their parenting plans. They should remain considerate of each other’s lives and schedules. They should also work towards including the kids in discussions involving their agreements so the children can feel important and valued, too.

Coordinate their schedules

Parents should work on coordinating their schedules, so there are few discrepancies and conflicts. When issues arise where either parent is unable to honor a prior parenting time agreement, that parent should provide as much notice as possible to the other parent, allowing for the creation of alternative arrangements that work in the best interests of everyone.

Co-parenting is valuable but can be challenging. It requires a huge commitment and a lot of work from both parents. Anyone who is currently divorcing a partner and interested in making co-parenting work should speak to an attorney for guidance.

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