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How to avoid or shorten a driver’s license suspension

On Behalf of | Oct 24, 2018 | Uncategorized |

Like most North Carolinians, you use your driver’s license every day. After all, getting to work, buying groceries, entertaining yourself and other routine events typically require driving. As you probably know, though, you do not have a legal right to drive on public roadways in the Tarheel State. On the contrary, holding a driver’s license and operating your car are revocable privileges.

Virtually no one enjoys dealing with law enforcement or administrative agencies. Nonetheless, if you are on the verge of receiving a suspended license, your livelihood may be in jeopardy. Accordingly, you may need to fight your license suspension to avoid significant consequences. While every situation is unique, you may increase your odds of either avoiding or shortening a suspension by taking the following three steps.  

1. Understand the point system

In North Carolina, officials may suspend or permanently revoke your driver’s license, provided they have cause. That is, law enforcement officers must have a legally valid reason to take away your driving privileges. Specifically, you may lose your authorization to drive for the following reasons:

  • Dangerous, careless, reckless or unauthorized driving
  • Impaired or intoxicated driving
  • Excessive or habitual speeding

The state also maintains a point-based system that affects the validity of your driver’s license. Various driving infractions cause you to accumulate points. If you collect 12 points over three years, officials may suspend your driver’s license. After an initial suspension, fewer points trigger subsequent suspensions. Multiple suspensions, of course, may eventually cause a license revocation.

2. Stop driving

Continuing to drive after receiving a license suspension is usually a mistake. Simply put, if you do not respect the suspension, you could make the situation worse. As mentioned above, North Carolina law allows officials to further limit driving privileges for unauthorized driving. You may even find yourself in jail.

3. Consider developing a defense strategy

You drive your vehicle every day. Once the thought of a suspended license soaks in, you are apt to realize the seriousness of the situation. Nonetheless, you may not have to accept a suspended license as a foregone conclusion. You may be able to keep your driving privileges. If driving is necessary for your everyday life, choosing to fight a license suspension may be best for you. 

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