PLEASE NOTE: our office remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. However, to keep our staff and you healthy, we do ask that business be conducted over the phone or via email if possible. We can also accommodate video conferencing as well and at this time we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person if necessary. We also now have online bill pay for your convenience. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Prompt, Aggressive Representation

Serving Harnett County Since 1969

Keeping social media from ruining your slip-and-fall lawsuit

| Mar 1, 2019 | Premises Liability |

If you filed a personal injury claim after a slip-and-fall accident, somebody is probably watching you.

That may sound a bit creepy, but it’s common practice these days for insurance companies and attorneys to monitor the social media accounts of injury claimants. Quite frankly, they’re looking for anything they can use against you in your case.

Unfortunately, just about anything can be distorted in an insurance adjuster’s eyes. A photo of you smiling and happy — instead of looking miserable and in pain — at a grandchild’s birthday party can be used as “proof” that you weren’t seriously injured. Casual comments from friends about seeing you at social gatherings (when you’re supposed to be at home and suffering) can be taken as more evidence that you’re malingering or exaggerating your symptoms.

Ideally, you should shut down your social media accounts entirely until your lawsuit is settled. However, given that many people use social media to stay in touch with far-flung relatives and family members, here are some alternative steps you can take that might protect you from intrusive eyes:

  1. Change your privacy settings. Put your social media accounts on the most restrictive setting so that the minimum number of people can view your posts.
  2. Delete strangers. If you’re like most people, you have a bunch of “friends” on your list that you don’t remember acquiring. Cut them loose and don’t add anybody you don’t personally know for the time being.
  3. Ask your friends not to tag you or post about you. A friend’s post that mentions you or has a photo of you could do just as much damage to your claim as a post of your own.

In addition, never post about the accident on your account unless your attorney tells you that it’s okay. You don’t want a careless comment to jeopardize all the hard work that’s gone into your slip-and-fall claim.

Archives

FindLaw Network